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Managed Aquifer Recharge and Natural Water Treatment Processes in Wastewater Reuse

  • Robert Maliva
  • Thomas Missimer
Chapter
Part of the Environmental Science and Engineering book series (ESE)

Abstract

Both the vadose and phreatic zones are active chemical, physical, and biological environments. The concentrations of pathogens and chemical contaminants tend to be reduced as water infiltrates into the soil, percolates to the water table, and flows through aquifers. The contaminant attenuation processes include filtration, sorption, precipitation, sedimentation, and various biological and chemical degradation processes. Water flowing through the soil (vadose zone) and within aquifers in some instances may experience deterioration in water quality. Trace metals and arsenic have leached into water stored in some managed aquifer recharge systems.

Keywords

Natural Organic Matter Vadose Zone Manage Aquifer Recharge Groundwater Environment Disinfection Byproduct 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Maliva
    • 1
  • Thomas Missimer
    • 2
  1. 1.Schlumberger Water ServicesFort MyersUSA
  2. 2. Water Desalination and Reuse CenterKing Abdullah University of Science and TechnologyThuwalSaudi Arabia

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