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Riverbank Filtration

  • Robert Maliva
  • Thomas Missimer
Chapter
Part of the Environmental Science and Engineering book series (ESE)

Abstract

Riverbank filtration (RBF), which is also referred to as bank filtration, is an old technology for treating surface water. Rather than obtaining water directly from a river or other surface water body and then treating it, surface water is drawn indirectly using wells located on land near the surface water body.

Keywords

Hydraulic Conductivity Produce Water Total Coliform Production Well Horizontal Well 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Maliva
    • 1
  • Thomas Missimer
    • 2
  1. 1.Schlumberger Water ServicesFort MyersUSA
  2. 2. Water Desalination and Reuse CenterKing Abdullah University of Science and TechnologyThuwalSaudi Arabia

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