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Biologging

  • Nobuaki Arai
  • Junichi Okuyama
Chapter

Abstract

In recent years, the habitats of wild animals and humans have overlapped remarkably as economic activity intensifies and expands. As a result, human activities in the biosphere have brought about a decrease in biodiversity and have become a destabilizing factor of the ecosystem; these can no longer be ignored. Human activities cause various frictions in the ecosystem, which in turn cause serious social problems such as damage to residents, agriculture, and fisheries. This is a pressing issue to be solved if society is to achieve sustainable use of natural resources. Thus we obliged to assess human impacts on the ecosystem and reclaim our role as a member of the biosphere in the ecosystem. Towards this cause, using behavioral information about wild animals helps to clarify their relationship with man. In this chapter, we introduce methods for acquiring animal behavioral information using the latest information technology.

Keywords

Global Position System Home Range Geographic Information System Data Logger Green Turtle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of InformaticsKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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