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Sex Determination Methods in Forensic Odontology

  • Balwant Rai
  • Jasdeep Kaur
Chapter

Abstract

Sex determination of skeletal remains is part of forensic investigations. The methods vary and depend on different factors. The only method that can give a totally accurate result uses DNA, but in many cases it cannot be used for several reasons, such as cost. Teeth are excellent material for forensic investigations and can be used in the determination of sex. This chapter focuses on the use of teeth and facial bones in sex determination.

Keywords

Sexual Dimorphism Vernier Caliper Pulp Tissue Maxillary Canine Craniofacial Morphology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Balwant Rai
    • 1
  • Jasdeep Kaur
    • 1
  1. 1.Earth and Life Sciences Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and ILEWGAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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