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Surveillance Programmes and Antibiotic Resistance: Worldwide and Regional Monitoring of Antibiotic Resistance Trends

Chapter
Part of the Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology book series (HEP, volume 211)

Abstract

Since the introduction of the penicillins many decades ago, multiple species of bacteria have responded to the use of antimicrobial agents in their ability to develop and transmit antimicrobial resistance. Increased consumption of antimicrobial agents, their misappropriate use among other factors have further catalysed this resistance phenomenon. As bacterial resistance is a global healthcare issue, appropriate monitoring through governmental, institutional and industry or pharmaceutical led surveillance programmes is essential. This chapter describes the resistance issue, factors affecting this issue and examples of such ongoing resistance surveillance programmes.

Keywords

Surveillance Resistance Global health Monitoring Antibiotic consumption Government Institutions Industry 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.IHMA Europe SàrlEpalingesSwitzerland

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