Advertisement

Atomic Intentions in Jason + 

  • Daniel Kiss
  • Neil Madden
  • Brian Logan
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6599)

Abstract

We consider interactions between atomic intentions and plan failures in the Jason BDI-based agent programming language. Atomic intentions allow the agent developer to control the execution of intentions in situations where a sequence of actions must be executed ‘atomically’ in order to ensure the success of a plan. However, while atomic intentions in Jason enforce mutual exclusion, they are not atomic operations in the sense understood in conventional programming or in databases, and failure of an atomic plan can leave the agent’s belief and plan bases in an inconsistent state. In this paper we present a new approach to atomic intentions which provides a transactional ‘all-or-nothing’ semantics, and describe its implementation in a new version of Jason, Jason  + . We argue that Jason  +  offers a more predictable semantics for atomic plans in the face of plan failure and can reduce the load on the agent developer by automating simple cases of failure handing, leading to the development of more robust agent programs.

Keywords

Plan Base Multiagent System Atomic Plan Mutual Exclusion Belief Base 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Bordini, R.H., Hübner, J.F., Wooldridge, M.: Programming Multi-Agent Systems in AgentSpeak using Jason. John Wiley & Sons Ltd. (2007)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Rao, A.S.: AgentSpeak(L): BDI Agents Speak Out in a Logical Computable Language. In: Perram, J., Van de Velde, W. (eds.) MAAMAW 1996. LNCS, vol. 1038, pp. 42–55. Springer, Heidelberg (1996)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Bordini, R.H., Hübner, J.F., Vieira, R.: Jason and the Golden Fleece of Agent-Oriented Programming. In: Bordini, R.H., Dastani, M., Dix, J., El Fallah Seghrouchni, A. (eds.) Multi-Agent Programming: Languages, Platforms and Applications. Springer, Heidelberg (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Madden, N., Logan, B.: Modularity and Compositionality in Jason. In: Braubach, L., Briot, J.-P., Thangarajah, J. (eds.) ProMAS 2009. LNCS (LNAI), vol. 5919, pp. 237–253. Springer, Heidelberg (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Bordini, R., Bazzan, A.L.C., de Jannone, R.O., Basso, D.M., Vicari, R.M., Lesser, V.R.: AgentSpeak(XL): efficient intention selection in BDI agents via decision-theoretic task scheduling. In: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems (AAMAS 2002), pp. 1294–1302. ACM Press, New York (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Ancona, D., Mascardi, V.: Coo-BDI: Extending the BDI Model with Cooperativity. In: Leite, J., Omicini, A., Sterling, L., Torroni, P. (eds.) DALT 2003. LNCS (LNAI), vol. 2990, pp. 109–134. Springer, Heidelberg (2004), doi:10.1007/978-3-540-25932-9_7CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Ancona, D., Mascardi, V., Hubner, J.F., Bordini, R.H.: Coo-AgentSpeak: Cooperation in AgentSpeak through plan exchange. In: Proceedings of the Third International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems (AAMAS 2004), pp. 696–705. IEEE Computer Society, Washington, DC (2004)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Bray, T., Hollander, D., Layman, A., Tobin, R.: Namespaces in XML 1.0, 2nd edn. Technical report, W3C (2006), http://www.w3.org/TR/2006/REC-xml-names-20060816
  9. 9.
    Dastani, M.: 2APL: a practical agent programming language. Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems 16, 214–248 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Dastani, M., Meyer, J.J.C.: A Practical Agent Programming Language. In: Dastani, M.M., El Fallah Seghrouchni, A., Ricci, A., Winikoff, M. (eds.) ProMAS 2007. LNCS (LNAI), vol. 4908, pp. 107–123. Springer, Heidelberg (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Busetta, P., Rönnquist, R., Hodgson, A., Lucas, A.: JACK intelligent agents - components for intelligent agents in Java. AgentLink Newsletter (2), 2–5 (1992)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Morley, D., Myers, K.: The SPARK agent framework. In: Proceedings of the Third International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems (AAMAS 2004), pp. 714–721. IEEE Computer Society, Washington, DC (2004)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Thangarajah, J., Harland, J., Morley, D., Yorke-Smith, N.: Aborting tasks in BDI agents. In: Proceedings of the Sixth International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi Agent Systems (AAMAS 2007), Honolulu, HI, pp. 8–15 (May 2007)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Thangarajah, J., Harland, J., Morley, D., Yorke-Smith, N.: Suspending and resuming tasks in BDI agents. In: Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi Agent Systems (AAMAS 2008), Estoril, Portugal, pp. 405–412 (May 2008)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Kiss
    • 1
  • Neil Madden
    • 1
  • Brian Logan
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Computer ScienceUniversity of NottinghamUK

Personalised recommendations