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Toward a Model for CIS

  • Chirag Shah
Chapter
Part of the The Information Retrieval Series book series (INRE, volume 34)

Abstract

Being a new and emerging area, CIS lacks a sophisticated and comprehensive set of theories and models that other fields such as IR and information seeking have enjoyed. Therefore, this chapter is not about definitive theories and models relating to CIS; rather, it shows how traditional information seeking models could help us create similar models for CIS. To situate the discussion on theories and models pertaining to CIS, this chapter provides a brief overview on various models developed for collaboration as well as information seeking. An attempt is then made to show how a model for CIS can be developed using Kuhlthau’s information search process (ISP) model. The success and shortcomings of this approach are shown using data from a user study. Further discussion is provided on understanding and incorporating an affective dimension to create a comprehensive model of CIS.

Keywords

Cloud Computing Affective Dimension Information Seek Computer Support Cooperative Work Positive Message 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chirag Shah
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Communication & InformationThe State University of New JerseyNew BrunswickUSA

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