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Audience: A Weak Link in the Securitization of the Environment?

  • Tasos Karafoulidis
Chapter
Part of the Hexagon Series on Human and Environmental Security and Peace book series (HSHES, volume 8)

Abstract

Since the late 1980s the academic community and policymakers have faced a new trend in the global security agenda. Only a few foresaw the utility and the broader theoretical implications that the debate on this new trend was to have. The concerns for environmental issues roughly coincided with the end of the bipolar ideological and military confrontation that triggered a rethinking of the traditional security agenda and the emergence of new and under-theorized issues in public discourse. Besides this uniquely favourable coincidence, one of the first large-scale catastrophes of modern times promoted the advance of environmental issues and specifically of the issue of climate change in western societies. In the United States, the drought of 1988 shocked the unprepared population and authorities of North America. Reflecting this challenge, Homer-Dixon addressed environmental aspects of global security (Homer-Dixon, 1991: 76–116).

Keywords

Climate Change Mate Change Environmental Security International Security Human Security 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ThessalonikiGreece

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