Political in Nature: The Conflict-fuelling Character of International Climate Policies

Chapter
Part of the Hexagon Series on Human and Environmental Security and Peace book series (HSHES, volume 8)

Abstract

Climate change is a political issue and currently a hot cake of the international debate. Agenda-setting surrounding this issue, framing of the problem, determination of the character of the crisis, and the possible solutions that are put on the table are subject to multilateral negotiations. Science points out that warming of the climatic system is unequivocal, and it is similarly clear that this is mostly due to human-made emissions of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHG), mostly CO2 (IPCC 2007).

Keywords

Climate Change Natural Disaster Clean Development Mechanism Disaster Risk Reduction Clean Development Mechanism Project 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Frankfurt/ MainGermany

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