Delay and Dropout Tolerant State Estimation for MAVs

  • Frédéric Bourgeois
  • Laurent Kneip
  • Stephan Weiss
  • Roland Siegwart
Part of the Springer Tracts in Advanced Robotics book series (STAR, volume 79)

Abstract

This paper presents a filter based position and velocity estimation for an aerial vehicle fusing inertial and delayed, dropout-susceptible vision measurements, without the a priori knowledge of the exact variable time delay. The data from the two sensors, which are running at different rates, is transmitted via independent wireless links to a ground station. A synchronization between both communication ways makes it possible to determine the image transmission and processing time. The computational complexity of the algorithm is kept at a low level. The images are processed by a Visual SLAM algorithm that builds up a map of the area and simultaneously tracks the pose of the camera. With a delay going up to 230 ms and an amount of 16% dropout in the vision data, we show that with the presented filter a quadrotor can be stabilized and kept in the region of a setpoint with a simple PID controller.

Keywords

Global Position System Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Inertial Measurement Unit Acceleration Measurement Camera Frame 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frédéric Bourgeois
    • 1
  • Laurent Kneip
    • 1
  • Stephan Weiss
    • 1
  • Roland Siegwart
    • 1
  1. 1.Autonomous Systems LabETH ZurichZurichSwitzerland

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