A Study of the Mobile Technology Literacy Indicators in Taiwan

  • Lin Peng-Chun
  • Cheng Hsu-Chen
  • Liao Wen-Wei
  • Yen Yung-Chin
Part of the Advances in Intelligent and Soft Computing book series (AINSC, volume 146)

Abstract

Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has proposed several information literacy competency standards on how to evaluate whether or not an individual has good information literacy. However, due to the popularity of smart phones and Tablet PCs, information technology has shown a significant change, and information literacy indicators have then seemed to be inadequate. The purpose of the study is to add indicators related to mobile devices focusing on the information literacy proposed by ACRL. The study has invited various mobile device experts to be the Delphi group member of the study, and the information technology literacy indicators will be amended to meet the mobile technology concept through the online Delphi questionnaire survey. The study has constructed mobile literacy indicators through 3 online Delphi questionnaire surveys, which are roughly similar to the information literacy indicators, they can, however, meet the mobile technology concept. The study result can be provided as a reference for the self-evaluation of relevant organizations and individuals.

Keywords

information technology literacy mobile technology literacy Delphi method 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lin Peng-Chun
    • 1
  • Cheng Hsu-Chen
    • 2
  • Liao Wen-Wei
    • 2
  • Yen Yung-Chin
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate Institute of Information and Computer EducationNational Taiwan Normal UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  2. 2.Information Management DepartmentChinese Culture UniversityTaipeiTaiwan

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