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Exposure Management (Minimization and Control of Collective Dose)

  • Robert Prince
Chapter

Abstract

Radiation exposures to personnel must be adequately controlled and maintained to ensure compliance with established administrative and regulatory dose limits. Accordingly, various control measures are established to routinely monitor, track, and trend personnel exposures. The primary objective of a LWR radiation protection program is to maintain the radiological safety of plant employees. A key element of this objective is to prevent any unnecessary exposure and to minimize necessary exposure associated with operation and maintenance activities. This concept is promulgated by international radiation protection societies and the radiation protection community in general. The system of dose limitation established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in Publication 26 in 1987, and continued in subsequent reports, recommends that any practice involving exposure to radiation produce a positive net benefit and that all exposures be kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) while considering the associated economic and social factors.

Keywords

Radiation Protection Work Package Work Control Dose Saving Radiological Safety 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Prince
    • 1
  1. 1.US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Marquis One TowerAtlantaUSA

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