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The Concept of Crime in International Criminal Law

  • Iryna Marchuk
Chapter

Abstract

Broadly, a crime is a socially harmful act or omission that breaches the values protected by a state. It is an event prohibited by law, one which can be followed by prosecution in criminal proceedings and, thereafter, by punishment on conviction. The state criminalises certain conduct due to burgeoning public pressure to proscribe certain immoral harms. However, criminality shall not be confused with immorality: they are related but not synonymous terms. A lion’s share of immoral acts is not criminalised, as well as not all criminal acts are immoral. It is within the discretion of a state to construe which acts require to be criminalised and incorporate such prohibitions into its respective criminal laws.

Keywords

Armed Conflict International Criminal Court Rome Statute Trial Chamber Geneva Convention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Iryna Marchuk
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of LawUniversity of CopenhagenCopenhagenDenmark

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