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Impact on Society and its Effect on Chemical Progress

  • Seth C. Rasmussen
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Molecular Science book series (BRIEFSMOLECULAR, volume 3)

Abstract

As presented in the previous chapter, the Venetian advancements in glassmaking led to its application in laboratory apparatus and development of laboratory glassware. While in many cases, the new laboratory glassware followed older designs previously fabricated from inferior materials, the quality and clarity of the Venetian glass also led to completely new and important objects such as lenses. In fact, some have stated that the most important long term consequence of clear glass manufacture was its development as a thinking tool through the production of mirrors, lenses, and eyeglasses. Through its application in eyeglasses, glass has corrected and helped preserve our eyesight, and its use in the telescope, microscope, spectrometer, and other optical instruments has widened and deepened our ability to see that which is very small or far away. This final chapter will outline the application of glass to the development of such additional critical glass objects and instruments, along with a discussion of how the developments in both the previous and current chapter impacted both society and progress in the chemical sciences.

Keywords

Sixteenth Century Thirteenth Century Laboratory Glassware Concave Lens Alcoholic Distillate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seth C. Rasmussen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemistry and BiochemistryNorth Dakota State UniversityFargoUSA

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