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Introduction

  • Seth C. Rasmussen
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Molecular Science book series (BRIEFSMOLECULAR, volume 3)

Abstract

Glass and its uses predate recorded history. Long before the ability to manufacture glass, early tribes discovered and shaped glass formed by nature. Such dark volcanic glass, or obsidian, is a naturally occurring silica-based material which is formed from the rapid cooling of volcanic lava. Obsidian can be found in most locations that have experienced the melting of silica-rich rock due to volcanic eruptions and such deposits were valued by prehistoric tribes due to the fact that it could be fractured to produce sharp blades or arrowheads.

Keywords

Manganese Dioxide Thirteenth Century Colored Glass Molten Glass Colorless Glass 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seth C. Rasmussen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemistry and BiochemistryNorth Dakota State UniversityFargoUSA

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