Challenges and Opportunities in the Use of CTCs for Companion Diagnostic Development

Chapter
Part of the Recent Results in Cancer Research book series (RECENTCANCER, volume 195)

Abstract

Circulating tumor cells offer promise as a surrogate source of cancer cells that can be obtained in real time and may provide opportunities to evaluate predictive biomarkers that can guide treatment decisions. In this review, we consider some of the technical hurdles around CTC numbers and suitability of various CTC capture and analysis platforms for biomarker evaluation. In addition, we consider the potential regulatory hurdles to development of CTC-based diagnostics. Finally, we suggest a path for co-development of anticancer therapeutics with CTC-based diagnostics that could enable clinical validation and qualification of CTC-based assays as companion diagnostics.

Keywords

Early Stage Breast Cancer HER2 Status CRPC Patient Early Phase Clinical Trial Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Garret Hampton and Andrea Pirzkall for their comments on the manuscript and useful discussions.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Oncology Biomarker DevelopmentGenentech, IncSouth San FranciscoUSA

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