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Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) and Cerebral Metabolic Rate (CMR)

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Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

Abstract

Over time, we have come to understand the concepts of cerebral blood flow and its relationship to pH changes and metabolism of the brain. Current evidence tells us that insufficient flow can lead to ischemic regions of the brain with poor clinical outcome. The challenge today is to find an economical hands-on method to measure CBF bedside. With such techniques, one could hope to foster better outcome for patients with TBI. Present methods still remain in the research realm; hopefully, future will see new avenues for CBF measurements that are specific, economical and easy to utilize at the bedside.

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Reinstrup, P., Bloomfield, E.L. (2012). Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) and Cerebral Metabolic Rate (CMR). In: Sundstrom, T., Grände, PO., Juul, N., Kock-Jensen, C., Romner, B., Wester, K. (eds) Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-28126-6_35

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-28126-6_35

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