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Sonic Rhinoplasty: Sculpting with the Ultrasonic Bone Aspirator

  • Edmund A. Pribitkin
  • Leela S. Lavasani
  • Carol Shindle
  • Jewel D. Greywoode
Chapter

Abstract

Sonic rhinoplasty involves the application of ultrasonic waves to sculpt the nasal bones in a manner unmatched by osteotomes, rasps, and other powered instruments. The Sonopet ultrasonic bone aspirator (Stryker, Inc., Kalamazoo, MI) utilizes ultrasonic waves to emulsify bone under concurrent irrigation and suction enabling precise, graded bone removal without damage to the surrounding nasal soft tissue and mucosa. The authors have applied this technology for bony dorsal hump and nasal spine removal, septoplasty, turbinate reduction, deepening of the glabellar angle, rounding of flat nasal contours, and correction of bony asymmetries. Sonic rhinoplasty improves upon current techniques that may be associated with decreased visualization, heat generation, mechanical chatter, and a lack of surgical precision with resultant soft tissue injury.

Keywords

Nasal Bone Lateral Cartilage Nasal Dorsum Soft Tissue Envelope Lateral Osteotomy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Disclosure

Edmund A. Pribitkin, M.D. is a consultant for Stryker, Inc.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edmund A. Pribitkin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Leela S. Lavasani
    • 1
    • 2
  • Carol Shindle
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jewel D. Greywoode
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck SurgeryThomas Jefferson UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck SurgeryThomas Jefferson UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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