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New World, New Worlds: Visual Analysis of Pre-columbian Pictorial Collections

  • Daniel Gatica-Perez
  • Edgar Roman-Rangel
  • Jean-Marc Odobez
  • Carlos Pallan
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 247)

Abstract

We present an overview of the CODICES project, an interdisciplinary approach for analysis of pre-Columbian collections of pictorial materials – more specifically, of Maya hieroglyphics. We discuss some of the main scientific and technical challenges that we have found in our work, and present a summary of our current technical achievements. This overview stresses the importance of thinking globally and acting both locally and globally with respect to developing approaches for cultural heritage preservation, research, and education.

Keywords

Computer Vision Technique Average Pairwise Distance Late Classic Period Terminal Classic Period Cultural Heritage Preservation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Gatica-Perez
    • 1
    • 2
  • Edgar Roman-Rangel
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jean-Marc Odobez
    • 1
    • 2
  • Carlos Pallan
    • 3
  1. 1.Idiap Research InstituteSwitzerland
  2. 2.École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)Switzerland
  3. 3.National Anthropology and History Institute of Mexico (INAH)Mexico

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