New Music Production Modes and Indigenous Music in North Queensland and the Torres Strait

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores the evolution of Indigenous music and musicians in North Queensland and the Torres Strait. In the current climate the production modes have changed dramatically from an industry based and controlled production system to a more independent and Internet based distribution and economy. Drawing on Dunbar-Hall and Gibson’s 2004 study as well as researchers including Hayward (Tide lines: Music, tourism & cultural transition in the Whitsunday islands (and adjacent coast). Lismore: Southern Cross University, 2001); Neuenfeldt (The World Of Music, 49, 7–21, 2007), and Castles (Tjungaringanyi: Aboriginal rock (1971–91). In P. Hayward (Ed.), Sound alliances: Indigenous peoples, cultural politics, and popular music in the Pacific (pp. 11–25). New York/London: Cassell, 1998), a brief overview of Indigenous music and musicians is presented, along with an examination of current practices. Case studies of Indigenous artists, such as David Hudson and Seaman Dan, are used as a means of highlighting current practices.

Keywords

Production Mode Torres Strait Islander Aboriginal Artist Western Music Traditional Music 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Creative ArtsJames Cook University TownsvilleTownsvilleAustralia

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