Advertisement

Preface to “Equity in Mathematics Education: Unions and Intersections of Feminist and Social Justice Literature”

  • Laura Jacobsen
Part of the Advances in Mathematics Education book series (AME)

Abstract

In recent years, research examining results from tests of mathematics performance has generally documented small or reduced gaps between male and female students (e.g., Else-Quest et al. 2010; Hyde et al. 2008; McGraw et al. 2006). However, this is not always the case. For example, research exploring the gender gap among high-achieving high school students, using data from the American Mathematics Competitions, has indicated that the gender gap widens dramatically at very high percentiles and that the highest-achieving girls are concentrated in a very small set of elite schools (Ellison and Swanson 2010). A study by Fryer and Levitt (2010) documented the emergence of a substantial mathematics gender gap in the early years of schooling in the United States, documenting that girls lose more than two-tenths of a standard deviation relative to boys over the first six years of school, across every strata of society.

Keywords

Mathematics Education Mathematics Classroom Gender Equity Mathematics Education Research Mathematics Anxiety 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Ellison, G. & Swanson, A. (2010). The gender gap in secondary school mathematics at high achievement levels: Evidence from the American Mathematics Competitions. Journal of Economic Perspectives, 24(2), 109–128. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Else-Quest, N., Hyde, J. S., & Linn, M. C. (2010). Cross-national patterns of gender differences in mathematics: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 136(1), 103–127. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Fryer, R. G., & Levitt, S. D. (2010). An empirical analysis of the gender gap in mathematics. American Economic Journal, 2(2), 210–240. Google Scholar
  4. Gates, P., & Jorgensen, R. (2009). Foregrounding social justice in mathematics teacher education. Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, 12(3), 161–170. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Gutiérrez, R. (2008). A “gap-gazing” fetish in mathematics education? Problematizing research on the achievement gap. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 39, 357–364. Google Scholar
  6. Huyer, S., & Westholm, G. (2007). Gender indicators in science, engineering and technology. Paris: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. Google Scholar
  7. Hyde, J. S., Lindberg, S. M., Linn, M. C., Ellis, A. B., & Williams, C. C. (2008). Gender similarities characterize math performance. Science, 321, 494–495. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Jacobsen, L. J., & Mistele, J. M. (2010). Please don’t do “Connect the dots”: Mathematics lessons with social issues. Science Education and Civic Engagement: An International Journal, 2(2), 9–15. Google Scholar
  9. Leder, G., & Forgasz, H. (2008). Mathematics education: New perspectives on gender. ZDM—The International Journal on Mathematics Education, 40(5), 513–518. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Lopez-Claros, A., & Zahidi, S. (2006). Women’s empowerment: Measuring the global gender gap. World Economic Forum, Geneva, Switzerland. Google Scholar
  11. Lubienski, S. T. (2008). On “gap gazing” in mathematics education: The need for gaps analyses. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 39(4), 350–356. Google Scholar
  12. Martin, D. (2009). Little black boys and little black girls: How do mathematics education and research treat them? In S. L. Swars, D. W. Stinson, & S. Lemons-Smith (Eds.), Proceedings of the 31st annual meeting of the North American chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (pp. 22–41). Atlanta: Georgia State University. Google Scholar
  13. McGraw, R., Lubienski, S. T., & Strutchens, M. E. (2006). A closer look at gender in NAEP mathematics achievement and affect data: Intersections with achievement, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 37(2), 129–150. Google Scholar
  14. Mistele, J., & Spielman, L. J. (2009). The impact of “Math for social analysis” on math anxiety in elementary preservice teachers. Academic Exchange Quarterly, 12(4), 93–97. Google Scholar
  15. Nolan, K. (2009). Mathematics in and through social justice: Another misunderstood marriage. Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, 12(3), 205–216. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Spielman, L. J. (2008). Equity in mathematics education: Unions and intersections of feminist and social justice literature. ZDM—The International Journal on Mathematics Education, 40(5), 647–657. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Spielman, L. J. (2009). Mathematics education in the public interest: Preservice teachers’ engagement with and reframing of mathematics. In S. L. Swars, D. W. Stinson, & S. Lemons-Smith (Eds.), Proceedings of the 31st annual meeting of the North American Chapter for the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (pp. 408–415). Atlanta: Georgia State University. Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Radford UniversityRadfordUSA

Personalised recommendations