Standing Shock Formation in a Non-reflected Shock Tube

  • R. G. Morgan
  • U. A. Sheikh
  • D. E. Gildfind
Conference paper

Introduction

The study of thermo-chemical relaxation processes in shock tubes requires flow with sufficient residence time to allow the relaxation process to complete. In the context of hypersonic reentry, the length scales of interest are determined by the size of the flight vehicles, which in general are too large to be reproduced in the laboratory. For non-equilibrium binary kinetic processes, density-length scaling (where the product of density with a characteristic length scale is conserved) may be used to reproduce flight conditions. However, for situations where equilibrium is reached, any change to the overall pressure level will change the chemical composition, and similarity with flight will not occur, Morgan [1]. Therefore to study the radiation from regions of equilibriumflow, test gas at the same pressure as exists in flight must be used. Because the conditions at equilibrium are not path dependent, provided the appropriate pressure and temperature are reached, it is possible to study the radiation from an equilibrium region by creating just a small section of the flow field.

Keywords

Test Section Shock Tube Incident Shock Shock Layer Blunt Body 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Morgan, R.G., Gnoffo, P., McIntyre, T., Sheikh, U.: Simulation of Radiating Flows in Impulsive Facilities. In: Proceedings of the 49th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting including the New Horizons Forum and Aerospace Exposition, Orlando, Florida. AIAA-2011-250, January 4-7 (2011)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Gildfind, D.E., Morgan, R.G., McGilvray, M., Jacobs, P.A.: High Mach number and total pressure flow conditions for scramjet testing. In: Proceedings of the 28th International Symposium on Shock Waves, Manchester, July 17-22 (accepted, 2011)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Jacobs, P.A.: Lld: A computer program for the simulation of transient-flow facilities. Report 1/99, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Queensland, Australia (1999)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Potter, D., Eichmann, T., Brandis, A., Morgan, R., McIntyre, T.: Simulation of radiating CO2-N2 shock layer experiments at hyperbolic entry conditions. In: Proceedings of the 40th Thermophysics Conference, Seattle, Washington, AIAA-2008-3933, June 23-26 (2008)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Seiff, A.: Ames Hypervelocity Free-Flight Research. Astronautics and Aerospace Engineering 1(11), 16–23 (1963)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. G. Morgan
    • 1
  • U. A. Sheikh
    • 1
  • D. E. Gildfind
    • 1
  1. 1.University of QueenslandSt. LuciaAustralia

Personalised recommendations