Advertisement

Numerical Investigation of Cavitation Bubble Dynamics Near Walls

  • E. Lauer
  • X. Y. Hu
  • S. Hickel
  • N. A. Adams

Introduction

The collapse of cavitation bubbles near walls is one of the major reasons for failure of technical devices involving the processing of liquids at large pressure differences. High-speed photography gives a first insight into the bubble dynamics during the collapse [4],[5] and shows two fundamental phenomena during the non-spherical cavitation bubble collapse process: first the development of high-speed jets and second the release of shock-waves upon final bubble collapse. Both, the impact of shock waves and of high-speed jets on a surface can lead to material erosion. A more detailed experimental investigation including a precise determination of peak pressures at the wall and its association with the initial bubble configuration and evolution is beyond current experimental capabilities.

Keywords

Cavitation Bubble Vapor Bubble Wall Pressure Semimajor Axis Bubble Collapse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Fedkiw, R., Aslam, T., Merriman, B., Osher, S.: A non-oscillatory Eulerian approach to interfaces in multimaterial flows (the ghost fluid method). J. Comp. Phys. 152, 457–492 (1999)MathSciNetzbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Hu, X.Y., Khoo, B.C., Adams, N.A., Huang, F.L.: A conservative interface method for compressible flows. J. Comp. Phys. 219, 553–578 (2006)MathSciNetzbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Jiang, G.S., Shu, C.W.: Efficient implementation of weighted ENO schemes. J. Comp. Phys. 126, 202–228 (1996)MathSciNetzbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Lindau, O., Lauterborn, W.: Cinematographic observation of the collapse and rebound of a laser-produced cavitation bubble near a wall. J. Fluid Mech. 479, 327–348 (2003)zbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Tomita, Y., Shima, A.: Mechanisms of impulsive pressure generation and damage pit formation by bubble collapse. J. Fluid Mech. 169, 535–564 (1986)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Schrage, R.W.: A Theoretical Study of Interphase Mass Transfer. Columbia University Press (1953)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Shu, C.W., Osher, S.: Efficient implementation of essentially non-oscillatory shock capturing schemes. J. Comp. Phys. 77, 439–471 (1988)MathSciNetzbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Lauer
    • 1
  • X. Y. Hu
    • 1
  • S. Hickel
    • 1
  • N. A. Adams
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Aerodynamics and Fluid MechanicsTechnische Universität MünchenGarching bei MünchenGermany

Personalised recommendations