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Asymmetric Interactions

  • Zvi Rosenberg
  • Erez Dekel
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter deals with defeat mechanisms which are due to asymmetrical interactions between the threat and the target, and their possible applications for armor systems. A major advancement in understanding and optimizing such defeat mechanisms is due to the continual improvements of three dimensional codes, which can follow these interactions accurately and efficiently. The basic asymmetry is obtained by inclining the target at a certain angle to the projectile’s line of flight. There are two ways to define the impact angle of the projectile, as shown in Fig. 7.1a, and we shall use both of them throughout this chapter. These are the inclination angle (α) between the velocity vector of the projectile and the plane of the plate, and the obliquity (β) between the projectile’s velocity vector and the normal to the plate. The asymmetry of the impact at inclined plates induces a net force on the projectile, which is perpendicular to the target’s surface. This force induces a torque on the projectile, which can result in its ricochet at obliquities beyond a certain threshold. Such an asymmetric interaction was demonstrated by Warren and Poormon (2001), for ogive-nosed steel rods impacting thick aluminum targets at different obliquities. The trajectory of the rod for an impact velocity of 1.184 km/s and an obliquity of 45° is shown in Fig. 7.1b. The asymmetric force on this rod’s nose result in its curved trajectory in the target and its pronounced bending, which enhanced its curved trajectory. As shown by the numerical simulations of Warren and Poormon (2001), rod bending and its subsequent ricochet was much less pronounced when the rod strength was increased by only 0.1 GPa.

Keywords

Steel Plate Impact Velocity Plastic Hinge Plate Velocity Incline Plate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ballistics CenterRAFAELHaifaIsrael

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