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Scaling Mobile Alternate Reality Games with Geo-location Translation

  • Sanjeet Hajarnis
  • Brandon Headrick
  • Aziel Ferguson
  • Mark O. Riedl
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7069)

Abstract

Alternate Reality Games (ARGs) are interactive narrative experiences that engage the player by layering a fictional world over the real world. Mobile ARGs use geo-location aware devices to track players as they visit real-world locations to progress the story. ARG stories are often geo-specific, requiring players to visit specific locations in the world and, as a result, ARGs are played infrequently and only by those who live within proximity of the locations that the stories reference. We present a solution to the geo-specificity problem called location translation, which transforms ARG stories from one geographical location to another, making them playable anywhere. We show that location translation addresses fundamental scalability challenges that arise from geo-specificity.

Keywords

Dependency Graph Location Translation Story Event Pervasive Game 15th International World Wide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sanjeet Hajarnis
    • 1
  • Brandon Headrick
    • 1
  • Aziel Ferguson
    • 1
  • Mark O. Riedl
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Interactive ComputingGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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