Extending CRPGs as an Interactive Storytelling Form

  • Anne Sullivan
  • April Grow
  • Tabitha Chirrick
  • Max Stokols
  • Noah Wardrip-Fruin
  • Michael Mateas
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7069)

Abstract

Computer role-playing games (CRPGs) have strong narratives, but in general lack a density of interesting and meaningful choices for the player within the story. We have identified two main components of player interaction within the story—quests and character interaction—to address in a new playable experience, Mismanor. In this paper we focus on the character interaction aspect. In particular, it describes how we use the Comme il Faut system to support emergent social interactions between the player and the game characters based on player’s traits and the social state of the game world. We discuss the design and creation of the game as well as the modifications to the systems required to support this new CRPG experience.

Keywords

character interaction game design role-playing games storytelling 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne Sullivan
    • 1
  • April Grow
    • 1
  • Tabitha Chirrick
    • 1
  • Max Stokols
    • 1
  • Noah Wardrip-Fruin
    • 1
  • Michael Mateas
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Games and Playable MediaUC Santa CruzUSA

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