“Should I Teach or Should I Learn?” - Group Learning Based on the Influence of Mood

  • César F. Pimentel
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6975)

Abstract

One’s mood influences one’s inclination to either rely on one’s current beliefs or search for different ones. Since mood may reflect one’s failures and achievements from interacting with the environment, perhaps this influence is working to our advantage.

We propose a simple agent architecture, where the behaviors of learning from or teaching other agents are dependent on the agent’s current mood. Using a particular multi-agent scenario, we demonstrate how this approach can lead an entire group of agents to learn a structured concept that was unknown to any of the agents.

Keywords

Emotionally Intelligent Negative Mood Target Action Positive Mood Group Learn 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • César F. Pimentel
    • 1
  1. 1.INESC-ID and Instituto Superior TécnicoTechnical University of LisbonPorto SalvoPortugal

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