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Pre-electronic Computing

  • Doron Swade
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6875)

Abstract

This paper outlines the grand narrative of pre-electronic computing by briefly reviewing the evolution of pre-electronic technologies and devices. A shift is made from a technocentric view to a user-centred approach that identifies four main threads which underpin traditional accounts. A map of how these combine to inform the accepted canon is offered. Entwined with the account are the contributions made by Brian Randell to the history of computing both as a field of study and to its specific content.

Keywords

History of computing automatic computation pre-electronic computing Charles Babbage mechanical calculation Totalisators Colossus Historiography 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Doron Swade
    • 1
  1. 1.Royal Holloway University of LondonUK

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