Advertisement

The Allocation of International Environmental Commodities

  • Hans Wiesmeth
Chapter
Part of the Springer Texts in Business and Economics book series (STBE)

Abstract

The increasing relevance of cross - Dborder environmental issues is mirrored in the quest for effective allocation mechanisms for international environmental commodities.Cost sharing agreements such as the commitments of the Kyoto Protocol are predominant “mechanisms”. For strategic goals the negotiations, which precede these international agreements, are gaining increasing importance. For example, a country might want to help or motivate others to participate effectively in activities to reduce cross-border environmental pollution. In contrast to the classical principal-agent approach not so much the unobservable effort of the agent is the main obstacle to an efficient outcome, as the question of appropriate instruments to achieve the goal. This chapter will therefore investigate tools in this context and analyze their practical relevance. After a brief survey on the role of international environmental agreements as allocation mechanism, the principal-agent approach will be used to investigate stable and efficient allocations resulting from international negotiations. Mitigation strategies and adaptation strategies regarding climate change will be addressed in particular.

Keywords

Adaptation Strategy Kyoto Protocol Initial Endowment Emission Trading System International Environmental Agreement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Barrett S (1997) Heterogeneous international environmental agreements. In: Carraro C (ed) International environmental negotiations. Edward Elgar, CheltenhamGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    BaumolW, OatesW(1988) The theory of environmental policy. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
  4. 4.
    Boer de I (1994) Trade and environment: a brief survey of current theoretical issues. In: Ierland van EC (ed) International environmental economics. Elsevier, AmsterdamGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Botteon M, Carraro C (1997) Burden sharing and coalitional stability in environmental negotiations with asymmetric countries. In: Carraro C (ed) International environmental negotiations. Edward Elgar, CheltenhamGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Carraro C (ed) (1997) International environmental negotiations. Edward Elgar, CheltenhamGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Carraro C, Siniscalco D (1997) R&D cooperation and the stability of international environmental agreements. In: Carraro C (ed) International environmental negotiations. Edward Elgar, CheltenhamGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Germany (2010) Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety: The German Adaptation Strategy cf. http://www.bmu.de/english/climate/adaptation_to_climate_change/doc/42825.php. Cited Nov 2010
  9. 9.
    Grossman GM, Krueger AB (1995) Economic growth and the environment. Quart J Eco 110:353–377CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    International Monetary Fund (IMF) cf. http://www.imf.org/external/about.htm. Cited Nov 2010
  11. 11.
    Siebert H (1991) Transfrontier pollution and global environmental media, KielWorking Paper No. 499. The Kiel Institute of World EconomicsGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Siebert H (2008) Economics of the environment, 7th edn. Springer, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Stiglitz J (1990) Principal and agent. In: Eatwell J et al (eds) The New Palgrave: Allocation, information and markets. Macmillan, LondonGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Svensson J (2000) When is foreign aid policy credible? Aid dependence and conditionality. J Dev Eco 61:61–84CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Swanson TM, Johnston S (1999) Global environmental problems and international environmental agreements. Edward Elgar, CheltenhamGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Weber S, Wiesmeth H (1991) Issue linkage in the European Community, J Common Market Studies XXIX:255–267Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Weber S, Wiesmeth H (2003) From autarky to free trade: the impact on environment and welfare, Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft 23:91–115Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Business and EconomicsTU DresdenDresdenGermany

Personalised recommendations