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Recent Trends in Emerging Transportation Fuels and Energy Consumption

  • B. G. Bunting
Conference paper

Abstract

Several recent trends indicate current developments in energy and transportation fuels. World trade in biofuels is developing in ethanol, wood chips, and vegetable oil / biodiesel with some countries being exporters and some importers. New drilling techniques, including deep-ocean drilling, extended horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing, are bringing new sources of natural gas and crude oil to market. Resulting increases in natural gas availability have also opened new opportunities in gas to liquids and combined gas, coal, and/or biomass to liquids. The energy landscape is currently undergoing unprecedented change, due to world economics and growth, energy prices, local preferences, and concern about regional air pollution and global warming. Most likely, all options will need to be developed to supply future energy needs, and the energy industry will remain in flux for the foreseeable future.

Keywords

Transportation Fuel International Energy Agency American Petroleum Institute Energy Information Administration Drilling Technique 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Oak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA

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