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Continuous Focus Field Variation for Extending the Imaging Range in 3D MPI

  • J. Rahmer
  • B. Gleich
  • J. Schmidt
  • C. Bontus
  • I. Schmale
  • J. Kanzenbach
  • J. Borgert
  • O. Woywode
  • A. Halkola
  • J. Weizenecker
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Physics book series (SPPHY, volume 140)

Abstract

The imaging volume that is rapidly encoded by drive fields in 3D magnetic particle imaging is limited by power dissipation and nerve stimulation thresholds. Additional coils have been implemented to generate so-called focus fields that operate at lower frequencies and extend the accessible imaging range. This contribution presents the possibility of sweeping the rapidly encoded imaging volume along an arbitrary 3D path using continuous focus field variations. This technique can be useful for following a tracer bolus, for tracking devices, or for dynamically moving the image focus to different regions of interest.

Keywords

Imaging Volume Power Dissipation Imaging Range Tracking Device Field Sweep 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Rahmer
    • 1
  • B. Gleich
    • 1
  • J. Schmidt
    • 1
  • C. Bontus
    • 1
  • I. Schmale
    • 1
  • J. Kanzenbach
    • 1
  • J. Borgert
    • 1
  • O. Woywode
    • 2
  • A. Halkola
    • 3
  • J. Weizenecker
    • 4
  1. 1.Research LaboratoriesPhilips Technologie GmbH Innovative TechnologiesHamburgGermany
  2. 2.Philips Medical Systems DMC GmbHHamburgGermany
  3. 3.Institute of Medical EngineeringUniversity of LübeckLübeckGermany
  4. 4.University of Applied SciencesKarlsruheGermany

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