Diagnostic Imaging in Cancer Therapy with Magnetic Nanoparticles

  • Stefan Lyer
  • Rainer Tietze
  • Stephan Dürr
  • Tobias Struffert
  • Tobias Engelhorn
  • Marc Schwarz
  • Arnd Dörfler
  • Lubos Budinsky
  • Andreas Hess
  • Wolfgang Schmidt
  • Roland Jurgons
  • Christoph Alexiou
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Physics book series (SPPHY, volume 140)

Abstract

The unfavorable application-to-tumor-dose-ratio is a drawback of conventional systemic chemotherapy, implying an often insufficient drug dose in the tumor being associated with severe side effects for the patient. The use of chemotherapeutics bound to magnetic nanoparticles offers several advantages. On the one hand it is possible to concentrate the chemotherapeutics in the tumor region by the use of magnetic fields, like it is done in Magnetic Drug Targeting (MDT). On the other hand magnetic particles can serve as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that is bound to the therapeutics. Hence, the particles possibly are opening an insight into drug distribution in the tumor region directly after administration.

Another important factor for a successful MDT-application is detailed knowledge about tumor vascularization.

In this pilot study we investigated vascularization and size of an tumor in an experimental in vivo tumor model via flat-panel angiography and DYNA-CT before MDT and the particle distribution with MRI after MDT.

We could show that the tumor could be displayed by MRI and DYNA-CT before and after MDT. Flat panel angiography revealed clearly the pathological tumor vascularization before MDT, while MRI imaging afterwards displayed the tumor as well as the particle distribution in the tumor.

Keywords

Magnetic Nanoparticles Tumor Region Magnetic Resonance Imaging Imaging Signal Extinction Left Hind Limb 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefan Lyer
    • 1
  • Rainer Tietze
    • 1
  • Stephan Dürr
    • 1
  • Tobias Struffert
    • 2
  • Tobias Engelhorn
    • 2
  • Marc Schwarz
    • 2
  • Arnd Dörfler
    • 2
  • Lubos Budinsky
    • 3
  • Andreas Hess
    • 3
  • Wolfgang Schmidt
    • 4
  • Roland Jurgons
    • 5
  • Christoph Alexiou
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine, Else Kröner-Fresenius-Stiftung-ProfessorshipUniversity Hospital ErlangenErlangenGermany
  2. 2.Department of NeuroradiologyUniversity Hospital ErlangenErlangenGermany
  3. 3.Pharmacology and ToxicologyFriedrich-Alexander University ErlangenErlangenGermany
  4. 4.Corporate TechnologySiemens AGErlangenGermany
  5. 5.Franz-Penzoldt-ZentrumUniversity Hospital Erlangen and Friedrich-Alexander University ErlangenErlangenGermany

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