Advertisement

A Supportive Social Environment for Self-regulation in Job-Hunters in Japan

  • Bjarte Johansen
  • Mu Fei Lin
  • Yuki Aoki
  • Weiqin Chen
  • Kazuhisa Seta
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6883)

Abstract

Job-hunting is a complicated process which requires applicants to recognise what job they are actually looking for and what the companies are looking for in applicants. Applicants must be able to carry out an analytical process about the job requirement and the company, their own skills, competencies and goals, and their application activities. This can be considered as a self-regulated learning process where job-hunters learn to use the skills of self-observation, self-judgement and self-reaction. In this paper we present a supportive social environment that aims to prompt job-hunters to be more aware of the different aspects of job-hunting and support the utilisation of different skills required in the process.

Keywords

Relation Analysis Mobile Client Metacognitive Activity Company Analysis Lifetime Employment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Cropanzano, R., Wright, T.: When a” happy” worker is really a” productive” worker: A review and further refinement of the happy-productive worker thesis. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research 53(3), 182 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Electronista.com: Apple grabs 72% of Japanese smartphone market (April 2010), http://www.electronista.com/articles/10/04/22/iphone.dominates.advanced.japan.phones/ (accessed: 2010-12-16)
  3. 3.
    Granovetter, M.: The strength of weak ties: A network theory revisited. Sociological Theory 1(1), 201–233 (1983)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Hollnagel, E.: Human reliability analysis: Context and control. Academic Press, London (1993)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Lin, X.: Designing metacognitive activities. Educational Technology Research and Development 49(2), 23–40 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    LinkedIn Corporation: About us (2008), http://press.linkedin.com/about (accessed: 2010-12-17)
  7. 7.
    Montalvo, F., Torres, M.: Self-Regulated Learning: Current and Future Directions. Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology 2(1), 1–34 (2004)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Montgomery, J.: Job search and network composition: Implications of the strength-of-weak-ties hypothesis. American Sociological Review 57(5), 586–596 (1992)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Near, J., Rice, R., Hunt, R.: Work and extra-work correlates of life and job satisfaction. Academy of Management Journal 21(2), 248–264 (1978)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Ryan, R., Connell, J.: Perceived locus of causality and internalization: Examining reasons for acting in two domains. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 57(5), 749–761 (1989)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Zimmerman, B.: Self-Regulated Learning and Academic Achievement: An Overview. Educational Psychologi. 25(1), 3–17 (1990)CrossRefMathSciNetGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bjarte Johansen
    • 1
  • Mu Fei Lin
    • 2
  • Yuki Aoki
    • 2
  • Weiqin Chen
    • 1
  • Kazuhisa Seta
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Information Science and Media StudiesUniversity of BergenNorway
  2. 2.Graduate School of ScienceOsaka Prefecture UniversityJapan

Personalised recommendations