Advertisement

Evaluation of Popularity of Multi-lingual Educational Web Games – Do All Children Speak English?

  • Dasun Weerasinghe
  • Lisa Lazareck
  • Patty Kostkova
  • David Farrell
Part of the Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering book series (LNICST, volume 69)

Abstract

Playing computer games is widely popular among children and teenagers as an entertainment activity; however, computer games can also be easily transformed into tools for education. City University London’s City eHealth Research Centre (CeRC) has developed such educational web games as a part of a European Project, e-Bug (www.e-bug.eu) to improve pupils understanding of the importance of hand and respiratory hygiene and responsible antibiotic use. This paper studies the usage of the Games between January 2009 and March 2010, specifically for 10 European Union countries. The Games were first provided in English-only and it was found that over half of the users were from non-UK countries. Once the Games were translated into multiple European languages, it was found that users preferred to play the Games in their native tongue. Thus, English was not a hindrance to Game playing/access; however, the option of using another language was always taken once provided. Users found the website through search engines and direct links from schools and other websites, and over 60,000 visitors played the Games at least once. The quantitative data used to investigate our research questions stemmed from the Games website server logs.

Keywords

educational web games game evaluation web logs translation 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Farrell, D., Kostkova, P., Lazareck, L., Weerasinghe, D.: Developing web games to teach microbiology. J. of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (Summer 2010) (in press)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    O’Hagan, M.: Video games as a new domain for translation research. Revista Tradumàtica – Traducció I Tecnologìes de la Informaciǒ I la Comunicaciǒ 05: Localitzaciǒ de videojocs, http://www.fti.uab.cal/tradumatica/revista ISSN: 1578-7559
  3. 3.
    Farrell, D., Kostkova, P., Weinberg, J., Lazareck, L., Weerasinghe, D., McNulty, C.A.M.: Can computer games wash your hands? An evaluation of the e-Bug junior game. J. of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (Summer 2010) (in press)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Lazareck, L.J., Farrell, D., Kostkova, P., Lecky, D., McNulty, C.: Learning by gaming – evaluation of an online game for children. In: Proc. 32nd IEEE EMBS Conference, Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 31-September 4 (2010) (in press)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Universal log file analysis and reporting proprietary software: Sawmill, http://www.sawmill.net (accessed June 2010)
  6. 6.
    de Quincey, E., Kostkova, P., Jawaheer, G., Farrell, D., McNulty, C., Weinberg, J.: Evaluating the online activity of users of the e-Bug website: evaluation of e-Bug. J. Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (Summer 2010) (in press)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© ICST Institute for Computer Science, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dasun Weerasinghe
    • 1
  • Lisa Lazareck
    • 1
  • Patty Kostkova
    • 1
  • David Farrell
    • 1
  1. 1.City eHealth Research CentreCity University LondonUK

Personalised recommendations