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Fundamental Study for Human Brain Activity Based on the Spatial Cognitive Task

  • Shunji Shimizu
  • Noboru Takahashi
  • Hiroyuki Nara
  • Hiroaki Inoue
  • Yukihiro Hirata
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6889)

Abstract

Recently, there is a pressing need to develop a new system which assists and acts for car driving and wheelchair for the elderly as the population grows older. In terms of developing a new system, examining human spatial recognition is important implications. We pay attention to determine direction as well as spatial, especially left and right, perceptions. The final goal of our measuring brain activity research is to contribute to developing new interfaces with functions that are responsive like human. So, we have performed experiments for investigating human spatial perception by measuring brain blood flow when subjects perform driving tasks. In virtual experiment using driving movies, we measured brain activity when T-junctions in driving movies were shown to subjects. In this time, we performed experiment in which brain activities were measured during actual car driving. We will report on these analysis and comparison results between virtual one and actual one.

Keywords

Brain Activity Road Sign Spatial Perception Premotor Area Hemoglobin Variation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shunji Shimizu
    • 1
  • Noboru Takahashi
    • 2
  • Hiroyuki Nara
    • 3
  • Hiroaki Inoue
    • 2
  • Yukihiro Hirata
    • 1
  1. 1.Tokyo University of ScienceSuwa
  2. 2.Graduate SchoolTokyo University of ScienceSuwa
  3. 3.Hokkaidou UniversityJapan

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