Design Environments for Material Performance

  • Martin Tamke
  • Mark Burry
  • Phil Ayres
  • Jane Burry
  • Mette Ramsgaard Thomsen

Designing for Material Performance

The research project that induced the Dermoid (Fig.1) installation investigates the making of digital tools by which architects and engineers can work intelligently with material performance. Working with wood as a material, we were especially interested how the bend and flex of wood, can become an active parameter in the digital design process. Traditional building structures facilitate load bearing through a correlation of compressive and tensile forces passing loads linearly through the building envelope. However, materials hold internal forces that can be incorporated into structural systems thereby reducing material use and leading to a more intelligent and potentially sustainable building practice. [2] [6]

Keywords

Design Environment Material Performance Digital Tool Reciprocal System Basic Polyhedron 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Tamke
    • 1
  • Mark Burry
    • 2
  • Phil Ayres
    • 1
  • Jane Burry
    • 2
  • Mette Ramsgaard Thomsen
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for IT and Architecture (CITA)Royal Academy of Fine Arts CopenhagenDenmark
  2. 2.SIALRMITMelbourneAustralia

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