Advertisement

Ornate Screens – Digital Fabrication

  • Daniel Baerlecken
  • Judith Reitz
  • Arne Künstler
  • Martin Manegold
Conference paper

Introduction

The English word ornament comes from latin ‘ornamentum’ , rooted in ‘ornare’, which can be translated with ‘to give grace to something’. In the past centuries diverse discussions about philosophy and necessity of ornament have formed. Alberti states in De re aedificatoria (1485) that a building is developed through massing and structure first; ornament is added afterwards to give the bold massing and structure ‘pulcritudo′ (beauty) as the noblest and most necessary attribute. Ornamentation serves to increase the ‘pulcritudo′ of a building and to create harmony in the overall intellectual and primary framework. A few hundred years later the critical theories of Adolf Loos (1908) describe ornament as immoral and degenerate –a suppression of the modern society neglecting the modern technologies.

Keywords

Structural Performance Mass Customization Nurbs Surface Suspension Cable Modern Architecture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alberti, L.: De re aedificatoria, on the art of building in ten books (translated by Rykwert, J., Leach, N., and Tavernor, R.). MIT Press, Cambridge (1988)Google Scholar
  2. Bloomer, K.: The nature of ornament. rhythm and metamorphosis in architecture. Norton & Company, New York (2000)Google Scholar
  3. Gell, A.: Art and Agency – An Anthropological Theory. Oxford University Press, London (1998)Google Scholar
  4. Gombrich, E.: The sense of order – a study in the Psychology of Decorative Art. Phaidon, London (1979)Google Scholar
  5. Spuybroek, L.: The aesthetics of variation. In: The Architecture of Continuity, Nai Publisher, Rotterdam (2008)Google Scholar
  6. Strehlke, K., Loveridge, R.: The Redefinition of Ornament, Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005. In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures, Vienna, pp. 373–382 (2005)Google Scholar
  7. Worringer, W.: Abstraction and Empathy: A Contribution to the Psychology of Style. Elephant Paperbacks, Chicago (1908)Google Scholar
  8. Künstler, A., Manegold, M., Reitz, J., BAerlecken, D.: Digital Processes. Detail Magazine (2011)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Baerlecken
    • 1
  • Judith Reitz
    • 2
  • Arne Künstler
    • 3
  • Martin Manegold
    • 3
  1. 1.Georgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.RWTH Aachen UniversityAachenGermany
  3. 3.Imagine StructureFrankfurtGermany

Personalised recommendations