Synthesis of Potential Phytochemicals: Pyrrolylindolinones and Quinoxaline Derivatives using PEG as an Environmentally Benign Solvent

  • A. V. K. Anand
  • K. Dasary
  • A. Lavania

Abstract

3-pyrrolylindolines and pyrrolylindeno[1,2-b]quinoxaline derivative, having pyrrole, indole and quinoxaline moieties known for antibacterial, antifungal and antiprotozoal properties, used in agricultural fields as fungicides, herbicides and insecticides, present in hormones responsible for plant growth have been synthesized in good yields, using Polyethylene glycol (PEG-400) which is an effective, inexpensive, non-toxic and an environmentally benign solvent used in drug designing.

Keywords

Inclusion Complex Polyethylene Glycol Indoleacetic Acid Indole Alkaloid Phase Transfer Catalyst 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. V. K. Anand
    • 1
  • K. Dasary
    • 1
  • A. Lavania
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Chemical Sciences, Department of ChemistrySt. John’s College, Agra UniversityAgraIndia

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