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Synthesis and Characterization of an Eco-Friendly Herbicides Against Weeds

  • N. Sidhardhan
  • S. Verghese P.
  • S. Dubey
  • D. Jain

Abstract

Herbicides that kill plants by inhibiting specific vital functions do not distinguish between crop plants and weeds. Such non-selective herbicides are generally applied before sowing/emergence of crop plants and their residual effects may affect crop performance. There is limited flexibility in the schedule of their application and their use requires caution. However, some crop plants enjoy naturally endowed resistance to specific herbicides. It is important to recall that although a large number of chemicals have been approved for weed control, their widespread and continuous use is not desirable owing to their toxicity and long-term effects on the environment. Hence an environmental friendly degradable, non-persistent, non-accumulative herbicides which can kill weeds, found in the roof top footpath and agricultural field have been synthesized by metathesis of ammonium salt and fatty acid characterized by IR, pH and Conductometric studies, as ammonium myristate is inherently a non-toxic substances and disappear after the desired period of herbicides activity and it is very safe to use as a weedicide. It is also found out the effective concentration to remove the weeds are at above CMC on daily application for fifteen days before the crop sowing.

Keywords

Crop Plant Weed Control Specific Conductance Myristic Acid Metal Carboxylate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Sidhardhan
    • 1
  • S. Verghese P.
    • 1
  • S. Dubey
    • 1
  • D. Jain
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistrySt. John’s CollegeAgraIndia

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