Security and Privacy in E-consumer Protection in Victoria, Australia

  • Huong Ha
Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT, volume 358)

Abstract

Governments in many countries have actively promoted both regulatory and self-regulatory approaches to govern e-commerce and to protect e-consumers. Nevertheless, the desired outcomes of e-consumer protection have not fully materialised. Although there are many research projects about e-commerce, security, privacy, trust, etc., few relate to e-consumer protection. In addition, most projects on e-consumer protection only focus on individual issues, rather than examining the entire coverage of the protection of e-consumers. This paper, a theoretical one, aims to fill these gaps by (i) identifying five issues in e-consumer protection, (ii) discussing the current regulatory and non-regulatory framework of e-consumer protection, (iii) examining the effectiveness of this current framework, and (iv) proposing how this framework can be improved to address current and future problems. This paper will use Victoria, Australia as a case study and takes into account the view of all stakeholders.

Keywords

E-consumer e-consumer protection e-retailing jurisdiction privacy security redress regulation self-regulation 

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Copyright information

© International Federation for Information Processing 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Huong Ha
    • 1
  1. 1.University of NewcastleSingapore

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