Physiological Measurement of Trust-Related Behavior in Trust-Neutral and Trust-Critical Situations

  • Karin Leichtenstern
  • Nikolaus Bee
  • Elisabeth André
  • Ulrich Berkmüller
  • Johannes Wagner
Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT, volume 358)

Abstract

In this paper we present results of a user study that we conducted with 21 subjects to investigate whether initial user trust is accompanied by unconscious bodily responses which enable more objective measurements than user reports. In particular, we recorded the user’s eye gaze and heart rate to evaluate whether users respond differently when interacting with a web page that is supposed to build initial trust as opposed to a web page that lacks this capability. Our results indicate that there are significantly different response patterns to trust-critical and trust-neutral situations during the interaction with a web page depending on whether the web page has helped users form initial trust or not. Knowledge of trust-related behavior can help to manage user trust at the runtime of the system since different usage phases can continuously be interpreted in order to detect situations which need to be considered to re-cover user trust.

Keywords

Subjective and Objective Measurement Physiological Data Trust-related Behavior Measurement Eye Gaze and Heart Rate 

References

  1. 1.
    Chen, S., Li, J.: An empirical research on consumer trust in e-commerce. In: IEEC 2009: Proceedings of the 2009 International Symposium on Information Engineering and Electronic Commerce, pp. 56–61. IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Fogg, B.J., Marshall, J., Laraki, O., et al.: What makes web sites credible?: a report on a large quantitative study. In: CHI 2001: Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on Human factors in computing systems, pp. 61–68. ACM, New York (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Hughes, L.W., Avey, J.B., Norman, S.M.: A study of supportive climate, trust, engagement and organizational commitment. Journal of Business & Leadership: Research, Practice and Teaching 4(2), 51–59 (2008)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Luhmann, N.: Vertrauen; ein Mechanismus der Reduktion sozialer Komplexitat. F. Enke, Stuttgart (1968)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Lumsden, J.: Triggering trust: to what extent does the question influence the answer when evaluating the perceived importance of trust triggers? In: BCS HCI 2009: Proceedings of the 2009 British Computer Society Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, pp. 214–223. British Computer Society (2009)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Mayer, R.C., Davis, J.H., Schoorman, F.D.: An integrative model of organizational trust. The Academy of Management Review 20(3), 709–734 (1995)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    McKnight, D., Cummings, L., Chervany, N.: Initial trust formation in new organizational relationships. The Academy of Management Review 23(3), 473–490 (1998)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    McKnight, D.H., Choudhury, V., Kacmar, C.: Developing and validating trust measures for e-commerce: An integrative typology. Info. Sys. Research 13(3), 334–359 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Nielsen, J., Snyder, C., Molich, R., Farrell, S.: E-Commerce User Experience. Nielsen Norman Gr. (2001)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Pecchinenda, A., Smith, C.A.: The affective significance of skin conductance activity during a difficult problem-solving task. Cognition & Emotion 10(5), 481–504 (1996)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© International Federation for Information Processing 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karin Leichtenstern
    • 1
  • Nikolaus Bee
    • 1
  • Elisabeth André
    • 1
  • Ulrich Berkmüller
    • 1
  • Johannes Wagner
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Centered MultimediaAugsburgGermany

Personalised recommendations