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Design and Implementation of Deformation Based Gesture Interaction

  • Wonkyum Lee
  • Sungkwan Jung
  • Sangsik Kim
  • Woojin Ahn
  • Sang-su Lee
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 174)

Abstract

We present an approach of designing and implementing a novel interaction in a future flexible display. By featuring flexibility of flexible displays, deformation-based gestures are employed as input techniques for interacting with digital contents. We designed gestures for the selected tasks, commonly found in commercial device, based on our prior study investigating how users prefer to manipulate flexible displays. We devised a concept of device which use the deformation based gesture interaction and implemented a prototype based on currently available technology. Sensors mounted on the prototype enable us to recognize deformation without visual sensors which are conventional in gestural recognition. The prototype is evaluated with applications that support our interaction by participants. Evaluation results show that deformation based gesture interaction can increase intuitiveness and fun.

Keywords

interaction design deformation-based interaction gesture interaction flexible display organic user interface 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wonkyum Lee
    • 1
  • Sungkwan Jung
    • 1
  • Sangsik Kim
    • 1
  • Woojin Ahn
    • 1
  • Sang-su Lee
    • 2
  1. 1.KAIST Institute for IT ConvergenceDaejeonSouth Korea
  2. 2.Department of Industrial DesignKAISTDaejeonSouth Korea

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