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Reconstructive Elicited Imitation as a Tool for Measuring Implicit L2 Knowledge

  • Anna Mystkowska-WiertelakEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Second Language Learning and Teaching book series (SLLT)

Abstract

Not free from controversy, the concepts of implicit and explicit knowledge and implicit and explicit memory have attracted the attention of second language acquisition researchers (e.g. Krashen 1981; N. Ellis 1994; R. Ellis 2004, 2005) who, apart from investigating the role of each of the concepts in language learning, have been interested in the kind of interface between the two types of knowledge. Numerous theoretical positions, even those formulating diametrically different views on the nature of language development, uniformly acknowledge that language acquisition largely involves the growth of implicit knowledge. It stands to reason that the debate over the interface between the two types of representation will not be resolved until reliable “pure” measures of implicit and explicit language knowledge are developed (cf. DeKeyser 2003). The foundations for developing such measures have recently been laid by Ellis (2004, 2005) and Erlam (2006, 2009), who have devised specific tests tapping the two types of linguistic knowledge. The present paper concentrates on the discussion of only one of them, elicited imitation, designed to measure L2 learners’ implicit knowledge, as well as its applications and possible limitations.

Keywords

Explicit Knowledge Language Acquisition Implicit Representation Implicit Knowledge Linguistic Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Adam Mickiewicz UniversityKaliszPoland

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