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Mix? Yes, but How? Mixed Methods Research Illustarted

  • Danuta GłówkaEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Second Language Learning and Teaching book series (SLLT)

Abstract

The purpose of the article is to present a theoretical framework of the study investigating relationships between students’ social factors such as, for example, place of residence, family financial status, or parents’ educational background and their foreign language proficiency level based on mixed methods research design. The presentation is preceded by a discussion of mixed methods research and followed by the evaluation of this approach based on the outcomes of the empirical investigation.

Keywords

Foreign Language Open Code Ground Theory Member Check Mixed Method Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Teacher Training CollegeLesznoPoland

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