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Focused Communication Tasks as a Way of Developing Accurate Speaking at the Advanced Level

  • Anna BroszkiewiczEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Second Language Learning and Teaching book series (SLLT)

Abstract

Developing speaking skills at the advanced level appears to be a demanding task. English philology students do already possess competence sufficient to communicate effectively, but the problem occurs when it comes to the use of advanced grammar structures (and vocabulary) in spontaneous real life language. Hence the need for research on how to help students transform their declarative knowledge of grammar into procedural and how to facilitate the implicit use of advanced structures. The article aims at reporting on the study which has been conducted among 1st year students at the Teacher Training College, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań. The study was carried out to establish if the teacher’s decisions concerning grammar instruction (employing focused communicative tasks) would help students transform their declarative knowledge into procedural knowledge, and also if communicative tasks would facilitate the implicit use of a given structure, rather than the explicit use. Two grammar structures were studied: the third conditional and modals in the past. For the purpose of this article, the findings obtained from the students’ recordings (individual and in pairs) will be presented. The author will share the results of the elicited imitation test and communicative activity, drawing special attention to changes in accuracy levels in the use of the two structures.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Teacher Training CollegeAdam Mickiewicz UniversityPoznańPoland

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