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Case Study Desertification: Central-Northern Namibia

  • Mary SeelyEmail author
  • Patrik Klintenberg
Chapter
Part of the Tropical Forestry book series (TROPICAL, volume 8)

Abstract

This chapter presents a case study of use of forest products in central-northern Namibia and its implications for land degradation. Wood is mainly used for domestic fuel and construction. Population increase over the past 100 years has led to increased demand for wood products, which resulted in extensive deforestation, a major cause of desertification in central-northern Namibia. Tree planting projects on communal farms have been launched, both for timber wood and fruit trees, in response to increasing demands and decreasing availability. In addition, forests and woody vegetation are conserved under the Forest Act of 2001. The future of Namibian forest resources depends on the success of these conservation initiatives in empowering communities and alleviating poverty.

Keywords

Woody Vegetation Fuel Wood Indigenous Forest Social Forestry Exotic Fruit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank the Director of Forestry, Mr. Joseph Hailwa, for his insightful contribution to this paper and the editorial board for their valuable comments on an early draft.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Desert Research Foundation of NamibiaWindhoekNamibia

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