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Neurohand Solving the Inverse Cinematic of an Anthropomorphic Arm

  • Marina Beltrán-Blanco
  • Javier Molina-Vilaplana
  • José Luis Muñoz-Lozano
  • Juan López-Coronado
Part of the Advances in Intelligent and Soft Computing book series (AINSC, volume 93)

Abstract

When an anthropomorphic arm has to reach a point in its workspace, many joint configurations are possible. That is the problem of inverse cinematic redundancy. This problem consists on several possible arm joint configurations for reaching the target point with the wrist (open cinematic chain). The humans solve the cinematic redundancy in a natural way learned in childhood. In this paper we describe the learning algorithm for artificial neural networks used to solve the cinematic redundancy in order to make a virtual robotic anthropomorphic arm has a ‘human’ joint configuration to reach a target point.

Keywords

Artificial Neural Network Hide Layer Radial Basis Function Hide Neuron Radial Basis Function Neural Network 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marina Beltrán-Blanco
    • 1
  • Javier Molina-Vilaplana
    • 1
  • José Luis Muñoz-Lozano
    • 1
  • Juan López-Coronado
    • 1
  1. 1.Automatic and System Engineering DepartmentUniversity Polytechnics of CartagenaSpain

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