Variable Spot Scanning and Wavefront-Guided Laser Vision Correction

  • Erik Gross
  • Seema Somani

Abstract

The excimer laser is a remarkable tool. It emits an invisible burst of light one hundred thousand times more intense than the noonday sun that lasts just billionths of a second. When that light reaches the cornea of a human eye, it etches away a few millionths of an inch of cornea and propels the ejected material outward at supersonic speeds. One engineer likened it to performing eye surgery with a light saber.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erik Gross
    • 1
  • Seema Somani
    • 1
  1. 1.VISX IncorporatedSanta ClaraUSA

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