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Subjective Difficulty Estimation for Interactive Learning by Sensing Vibration Sound on Desk Panel

  • Nana Hamaguchi
  • Keiko Yamamoto
  • Daisuke Iwai
  • Kosuke Sato
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6439)

Abstract

In this paper, we propose a method which estimates the student’s subjective difficulty with a vibration sound on a desk obtained by a microphone on the back of the desk panel. First, it classifies the student’s behavior into writing and non-writing by analyzing the obtained sound data. Next, the subjective difficulty is estimated based on an assumption that the duration of non-writing behavior becomes long if the student feels difficult because he (or she) would not have progress on answer sheet. As a result, the accuracy of the proposed so simple behavior classification reaches around 80%, and that of the subjective difficulty estimation is 60%.

Keywords

subjective difficulty estimation behavior classification 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nana Hamaguchi
    • 1
  • Keiko Yamamoto
    • 1
  • Daisuke Iwai
    • 1
  • Kosuke Sato
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Engineering ScienceOsaka UniversityOsakaJapan

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