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Discovering Role of Linguistic Geometry

  • Boris Stilman
  • Vladimir Yakhnis
  • Oleg Umanskiy
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6438)

Abstract

Linguistic Geometry (LG) is a type of game theory for extensive discrete games scalable to the level of real life defense systems. LG was developed by generalizing experiences of the advanced chess players. In this paper we summarize experiences of highly successful application of LG to a diverse set of board games and military operations. We believe that LG has a more fundamental nature than simply yet another mathematical theory of efficient wargaming. Every LG application generated new ideas that experts evaluated as brilliant. We suggest that LG is a mathematical model of human thinking about armed conflict, a mental reality that existed for thousands of years. The game of chess was invented 1.5-2 thousand years ago (following different accounts) as a formal gaming model of ancient wars. In our case, chess served as a means for discovering human methodology of efficient warfare. To test this hypothesis we would have to demonstrate power of LG software on wars happened at times when the game of chess had been unknown. In this paper, we present an approach to LG-based analysis of the battles of Alexander the Great demonstrating that after tuning the LG-based software will generate the same courses of action as those reported by the historians.

Keywords

Linguistic Geometry game theory search Artificial Intelligence ancient warfare 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Boris Stilman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Vladimir Yakhnis
    • 2
  • Oleg Umanskiy
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and EngineeringUniversity of Colorado DenverDenverUSA
  2. 2.STILMAN Advanced Strategies DenverDenverUSA

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